Cart

Interview with Adam Taylor – Chelsea High School

Chelsea HSA lot of our readers deal with high school athletes, so when a highly successful high school strength & conditioning coach stopped by Total Performance, we jumped on the opportunity to talk to him about what has made his program so successful. As you’ll hear him say right off the bat, he doesn’t think his situation is “reality” for many schools, but we think it probably should be.

Adam gets to teach strength & conditioning classes every hour of the school day, which means that just about every athlete in the school gets to train with him. No matter what aspect of strength & conditioning you’re involved in, you’ll be interested in hearing about what could (or should) be the future of the profession at the high school level.

Keep coming back to Ultimate S & C for the best strength and conditioning information on the net.

One Response to Interview with Adam Taylor – Chelsea High School

  1. Allen Michaels November 6, 2011 at 3:34 pm #

    Although some positive effects of running an in school strength program exist, negative effects of having a strength program ran during the school day are abundant. Starting with a glaring positive, all of the benefits of the after school program still exist for those participants. Another positive is that athletes who participate in multiple sports and have limited after school time to participate in S&C will be able to participate; although we must then consider the amount of competing demands we are creating for those athletes. On the flip side, the fact that S&C is now a class that the athletes “must” take will detract from their high school experience through limiting the diversity in elective classes they take. This is very important because we must consider a job as a teacher being seperate from a job as a coach. There is no question that this time is a valuable experience for the athletes in the school, but equal access should be afforded to the non-athletes in the school. In that system all student’s needs could be met with the following premise: Rather than creating workouts and having students complete this pre-written, pre-determined program, which is a process of coaching, a process more relevant to a teacher would be relaying concepts of strength training, fitness, and conditioning and have the students design a program that would help them meet their fitness and performance goals. In this type of ‘class’ setting, teaching goal setting, fitness principles, physiological processes, anatomy, physiology, and other fitness principles in an advanced way would strongly benefit every participant and every member of the school community.

    An individual should seperate a teacher’s role from a coach’s roll. Roll-out-the-ball weight lifting is an after school activity. By doing what Chelsea is doing we undervalue the roll of a teacher and relay an ugly message to the school’s students: That the gymnasium is for athletes, not everyone.

Leave a Reply

Design: WebKreativ.net